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of that. [laughter] but i am very pleased to be here at asu's sandra day o'connor's college of law and appreciate the opportunity to speak. and i especially want to thank greg hill the executive director of the indian legal program, darlene and of course patty ferguson for inviting me to be here. i am just so pleased and glad and honored to once again be here at the college and to be part of this lecture series. i have to say at the outset that the program is certainly well known nationally. as a national leader in education and the field of federal indian law. over the years i have very much valued my opportunity to work with the esteemed professor here in various matters. the professor bob clinton and over year bob miller, professor miller, of course professor kevin goldberg currently at the smithsonian's, patti ferguson bonnie as well as carl and i just have to commend the school for such an all-star lineup of indian law professors, part of the faculty of his meeting ranking law school and i'm so glad to be here. i've been inspired by the scholarship, the innovation and the lead
an opportunity before we turn to our witnesses. the debate over stand your ground laws raises fundamental questions about self-defense in the be united states of america. in recent years we've seen a dramatic increase in laws expanding the situation in which a person can legally use deadly force in response to a perceived threat. florida passed the first of this new wave of stand your ground laws in 2005. prior to 2005, florida law held that a person outside his home could not use deadly force and then claim self-defense if the person could have safely avoided the confrontation. this, quote, duty of safe retreat, closed quote, sought to prevent public disputes from escalating into violence. but the gun lobby pushed to change florida's law so people could shoot someone who threatened them without first trying to avoid a confrontation. florida wasn't the first state to adopt the stand your ground principle, but florida's 2005 law expanded the principle in several dramatic new ways. first, the law grants criminal and civil of immunity for use withs of deadly force -- for uses of deadly force
." that's because he found out that his policy, which came into effect just two months after the law's arbitrary cutoff date for grandfathered plans, will be discontinued next year. and he's not happy about this at all. especially given the fact that a plan on the obamacare exchanges will dramatically drive up his insurance costs from $400 a month to more than $700 a month with zero subsidies available. here's what he had to say. he said my wife and i are 54. we don't need maternity care, and we don't need obamacare. well, he's right to be upset. this is simply not in keeping with the spirit of the president's oft-repeated promise. perhaps the administration would like to tell him he should have just done a better job of keeping up with its regulatory dictates. but what about the millions who purchased their plans relying on the president's promise that they could keep them? what about the husbands and wives across kentucky who suffered when two of our largest employers had to drop spousal coverage? what about the folks who lost coverage at work? what about all the smaller paychecks
of blacks who claim soft defense understand your ground law are convicted at much lower rates than other racial groups? is not all also these cases are the same. blacks are killed in confrontations where -- were 13 percentage points more likely to be armed than whites. blacks,lled by other the were more often in process of committing other crimes. they were involved in cases where was likely to have a witness. if you run regressions where you try to call all the factors that were brought up in the data set, you find that white defendants are more likely to be convicted by black defendants, and people invoking stand your ground laws who kill blacks are also more likely to be convicted than those who killed whites. what you find when you look at it, the people who initiate confrontation were more likely to be convicted, and when there were eyewitnesses, they were less likely to be convicted. armed individuals were more likely to result in convictions. the urban institute report that is brought up earlier or think shows the opposite of what has been quoted here. mention,tant thing to the p
received overwhelming number of stories from my constituents with concerns about the health care law. >> 23,000 are losing access to the state sponsored program which covered those with preexisting conditions, seniors and small children and small businesses. one small business owner, greg from my district shared this story with me. i want to share this with diane. i operate a small painting business and very happy with the cover tennessee program for small businesses and their employees. it had a small co-pay and covered up to $25,000 each year. it covered 12 doctors visits and annual physical at reasonable costs and this is being canceled effective january 2014 because it does not meet the requirements of obama care. this directly contradicts the comments made by president obama that we could keep our existing program. they had affordable health care that they liked but they didn't get to keep that. and i ask, is this right or is this just for this group of people. these 28,000 citizens of tennessee are now forced to find new coverage plans on the health care website there are people out t
hearing on stand your ground laws. itnesses include the mother of trayvon mar on the. you'll hear from supporters of the law that currently exist in one form or another in as many as 30 states h. is an hour and a alf. >> can i ask you all to please stand. it is customary to administer the oath before the subcommittee. will your testimony be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so hope you god? let the record reflect that the witnesses answered in the affirmative. each witness will be given five minutes for an opening statement. any written statement will be admitted without objection. our first witness is sabrina fulton. she is the mother of trayvon martin. her son was shot and killed at the age of 17 on the night of february 26, 2012 in sanford, florida. his parents have created a foundation to provide support and advocacy for the victims of violent crimes. she is a graduate of florida memorial university. thank you for coming here today. please proceed with your testimony. >> thank you so much for taking the time to listen to what i have to say and the rest of the p
it's only the federal government has an estimated 5000 or so criminal laws that have over criminalized this country. hopefully when i am here again for a hearing weekend fervently work toward eliminating or correcting the thousands of federal laws that have sometimes put people behind bars for things that most americans have no clue would be against the criminal law. so senators i humbly implore you let's leave state criminal law to the consideration of the state legislatures though we in congress will probably be well served to take advice from the states that are still solvent. thank you. >> thank you congressman gohmert and i want to thank your college scholars from the tear is in congressman fudge for their testimony as well. we appreciate your being here today and we are going to proceed to the second panel as you depart. thank you again. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> i'm sorry. if i can ask you all to please stand. it's customary to give the oath before this committee. if you please raise your right hand. view from the testimony you're about
. it attacks cost drivers like medical liability law that are making health care unaffordable. it restores pricing flexibility to plans so a healthy young person can again purchase catastrophic insurance for next to nothing. it takes the best of the american health care system, preserves it, and corrects its flaws. i realize the senate's likely to bury this reform as it has so many, but it's important that the house pass it so that the american people can see that there is still hope to save what was once the finest health care system in the world and can be again as soon as this favored dream of obamacare finally breaks. we have just been through a government shutdown because democrats refused even to consider delaying the obamacare train wreck. they got their way, and that train wreck is now upon us. i believe in the coming months the american people will recognize the urgent warnings that the republicans tried so desperately to convey. and they'll be looking for a way out. we need to blaze that trail now. for that reason i rise to ask the house leadership to bring the republican health
that these are just real americans committed to following the law and catching bad guys at the end of the day. it's important we get to the privacy issues that are important. i just wanted to ask this particular question. i dpsh some talk about a permanent advocate in the fisa court. i scratch my head a bit, and i can't find that anywhere else, and in a criminal grand jury, there's no advocate on behalf of the person they're seeking indictment; is that correct? >> that's correct. there's no advocate, and even when a witness goes in a grand jury, they don't go in and are not allowed to go in with an attorney, and in particular, probably the closest am ji is the acquisition of a wiretap for domestic criminal law enforcement, and that doesn't involve any sort of adversary process at all, but an ex parte process with the government or agent going in similar to the fisa process we have now. >> and by design, the court was supposed to be that adversary -- too strong a word -- but to check the compliance with the law and constitution; is that correct? >> correct. this is the constitutional protection th
go to law school, he's a lawyer. imagine a black person goes to elite law school, graduate from law school, and when that person goes for a job, let's say at an elite law firm for six to get a job with a distinguished judge, or seeks to get a job at any place selective. the person that's going to be assessing this candidate is going to mark down the candidate to some degree because of affirmative action. the person who is assessing the candidate knows that the school has affirmative action, and by the way, virtually every selective law school in the united states has affirmative action. so if you have a black person who has graduated, graduate from harvard law school or graduate from where he went to school, yale law school. they go to the fancy firm, sure, they've got a nice brownie points they went to this fancy law school, but what he has in mind is the person accessing the candidate will say, yes, this person has a nice halo of having gone to yale law school or harvard law school, but the person doing the assessment is going to dim that halo. the person is going to say, this per
a warrant. and haseen a law clerk a distinguished career both outside and inside the aclu. please join me and welcoming our distinguished panel. [applause] henry, over to you. >> thank you, gred. -- greg. >> we are here to talk about security and privacy. events of the last two years have put these in the forefront. the boston bombing reminded us that terrorism is still an ex officio -- and existential threats. a month later, edward snowden began releasing revelations about massive surveillance that our government was doing. this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. as you heard from greg, it is our mission at rand to improve the quality of public policy decision-making. that is why we brought together this panel. people who have different views. everyone here has deep expertise. we are hoping to have an open discussion. there will be some things and questions they will be unable to answer because of the situations. we will try to guide the discussion over a few topics. we will start with trying to understand what works with intelligence security a
into treatment in the first place. there is 4 l's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for chronic disease, a landmark study for the journal medical association in 1999, showed that results for treatments were no worse or better than any other chronic
for valid foreign intelligence purposes and we work within the law >> the response - america's spy chief explains why they gather intelligence on u.s. allies. >> i want to apologise to you that the website has not worked as well as it should >> admitting problems - the website that is supposed to let americans sign up for health care has republicans and democrats calming for delay. >> it's beautiful. >> helping survivors of sandy reclaim some of their precious belongings >> the ambitious project completed in turkey to expect two continents under water. -- to connect two continents under water. >> no apologies, no excuses from the top spy chiefs. the head of the national intelligence told house intelligence committee that phone taps on foreign citizens are not true. the nsa would rather take the beating in the media than give up a program protecting americans from terrorists. >> top chiefs say the agency did nothing illegal, and part of the problem is leaked documents. they reveal rare details of america's surveillance techniques. >> vigorously defending the job agencies do to keep americ
care. and then deval did the right thing by picking up the torch and working to make the law work even better. and it's because you guys had a proven model that we built the affordable care act on this template of proven bipartisan success. your law was the model for the nation's law. so, let's look what's happened. today the affordable care act requires insurance companies to abide by some of the strongest consumer protections this country has ever known. a true patients bill of rights. no more discriminating against kids with preexisting conditions. no more dropping your policy when you get sick and need it most. no more lifetime limits or restricted annual limits. most plans -- most plans now have to cover free preventive care like mammograms and birth control. young people can stay on their parents' plan until they turn 26. all of this is in place right now. it is working right now. now, the last element of this began on october 1st, when the affordable care act created a new marketplace for quality, private insurance plans, for the 15% or so of americans who don't have health care
. for the first time really since watergate when we got the scandal that led to the laws we have today in large part, we saw the money pouring in in a completely unprecedented way. it is only going to get bigger or worse if you do not think that is the way it should be in 2014 and especially 2016. host: let's go to matt on our line for independents in plano, texas. caller: think you for telling -- taking my call. good morning, andy. --anted to ask i do not think it past congress? is that correct? we ended up with a neutered version of it that did not cover congressional staff. that surprised me. i remember hearing stories about staff involved with the scandal in a bank. that is the biggest problem. you look at all the money coming into elections and the so-called notpendent tax that are independent. it worries me that congress is using these committees to, you know, enrich themselves. can weed out some of this dark money going into congress. so, we start getting them in are just going to see more. it's just going to continue. host: andy kroll, we want to point out a highlighted piece from june
that is setforth in the ordinance. understate law and the constitution when the city imposes development fees such as this, the city must base those fees on a finding that there is a nexus between the amount of the fee charged and the impact of the fee. so before the board adopted the condominium oh conversion ordinance in june, the city hired a consultant on the impact of the affordable house is in the city. that study was part of the board's packet when you considered the condominium conversion ordinance in june. that study conclude that there is a nexus between condominium conversion and the need for affordable housing. that converting two condominiums creates additional need for affordable housing in the city and concluded that for condos that are worth $300,000 that convert the impact on the city in terms of affordable housing need is $21,000 and the impasse of conversion goes up depending on the value of the condominium oh as the value of the condominium oh goes up. the ordinance relied on that study and adopted as part of it's finding of that study and applied a $20,000 per unit fee fo
to say nevada law also includes robust protections against this type of discrimination. officer carney testified before the house of representatives in 2007 and shared his story. mr. president, this is what he said: "i'm god cop. i've lost two and a half years of employment, fighting to get that job back because i'm gay. i never would have been able to do that had i not lived in massachusetts or in one of the handful of other states that protect employees from discrimination. sadly you mr. president, not everyone is able to fight back like officer carney. in 33 states, lesbian, gay yo cn be fired or harassed just for being who they are. sam hall was terrorized by his coworkers for seven years because he was gay. mr. hall just wanted to make a living. but supervisors told him he would have to endure the persecution if he wanted to keep his job. west virginia is one of 33 states with no protections against this type of discrimination. that's why, mr. president, i so admire joe manchin for recognizing that this is an issue that's important to everyone. patchwork of state laws excludes ten
written about laura's law that some of the post poignant arguments from family members that they have done everything they can do but don't know how to help a loved one. what would you have done? could force treatment made a difference? >> yes. absolutely. laura's law is not forced treatment. i don't know why mr. vega keeps using that word because laura's law is an upfront tool before somebody needs crisis. if they are proven to be a danger to themselves or someone else, a judge tries to get a treatment team and they try to talk with this person and figure out a way for them to stay out of the hospital. we have forced treatment, we have 51/50. my son has been through 51/50 numerous times. he's been slammed with this. this is a horrible experience. laura's law is a tool, only a tool that may help. for whoever can help, and thank god they don't to have go through the other part. i would say the same thing as this officer said is that some people can't help themselves. the not civil to sit here and watch people lose their lives. i can tell you that. i have been in groups for 4-and-a-half y
it was just an economic hardship, but it's much more than that. it's being disabled and i feel maybe the law missed that some of the tenants were in tic and some tenants might be disabled and having an up the -- tough time of finding offeredable housing in the city. my appeal is to appeal to your hearts and to understand that yeah, my economic hardship it's not something out of choice. it's purely based on my disability and it's my reality right now and i find completely it's my opinion, right? so i find completely contradictory that i have to pay at this point $8,000 that i don't have. i have to lend it from my family which i have to payback for future low income housing that i might go when i'm not planning to leave that home when it took me 3 years to find anytime, maybe when i'm dying, maybe i will leave my home. that's it. it took me 3 years to find it. i want you to know that i feel and i don't think i can speak for every disabled person but at least the people with the disability that they are bound to a wheelchair, that it's almost impossible to find accessible housing. we are left
on the formal identity of the parties instead of on the law that we say and that the government acknowledges implicates religious liberty interests. the district court did answer these two questions first whether or not gilardi is substantially burdened by the hhs this -- hhs mandate and the court encrypt they said no. the court incorrectly said no. had the court answered either of these crackly nephew it would have received a strict scrutiny test which should've been easy given the massive holes in the scope of the coverage written to this mandate and the ready availability of less restrictive means of achieving the government schools. as we see this case there are four tabs or roots to get to strict scrutiny. the first one is to look at the gilardi's as individuals and whether or not there's a burden on them. the second is the companies as persons exercising religion. the third is what some courts have referred to as they pass through standing whereby a closely held family type corporations such as this one can assert the free exercise rights of its owners and forth is a roots that only ju
officers plan to treat sex offenders on halloween night. >> reporter: we will see law enforcement target a small number of sex offenders to get them off the street. but there's other areas that want to ban all sex offenders from participating on halloween and that effort has failed. we know of two things 2-year- old christopher likes to do that's to run and trick or treat. >> i love taking him trick or treating. candy she loves candy. >> reporter: his mother also looks forward to halloween and supports laws that stops sexual predators from participating such as putting out decorations or giving out candy. >> if you're on megan's law list don't bother. we don't want our kids around you. >> reporter: every year, parolees are banned from decorating or keeping porch lights lit on halloween night. but that only applies to parolees. the city of orange in southern california passed an ordnance to force all sex offenders to put a warning sign on their front door on halloween night. but a group called california reform sex offenders law fought them in court and won. we talked to that group
't they? >> it is the law they must get another plan. continuous coverage is part of the law. >> so -- >> that wasn't the case in the past. >> and she also acknowledged that the two weeks spent testing the site was not enough time. there was concern problems would arise, no one estimated how extensive the problems would in fact be. >> clearly looking back, it would have been ideal to do it differently. we had a product that frankly people have been waiting decades to have access to affordable health care. clearly the testing should have been longer, should have been more sufficient. >> nbc news capitol hill correspondent kelly o'donnell joins us live. we watch hours upon hours of questioning but it seems as if the ball essentially moved to december, when this will essentially be a reboot to see where things stand. basically i'm saying nothing was accomplished and we knew her answers and heard them from the administration before and this is a wait and see period. >> she reassured members of congress again and again that she is confident about the november 30th deadline that is sort t
to inspire has been evident throughout his remarkable career in law enforcement. as a decorated assistant u.s. attorney for the southern district of new york. deputy attorney general under attorney general ashcroft in the bush administration, he has achieved what one thought was the pinnacle of a law enforcement career. and now this. all of this experience, all of this past experience that jim has had makes him particularly well suited to lead the fbi as it's director. jim understands that justice in this country does not just happen because we're a great constitutional democracy. it depends upon the hard work of thousands of men and women for whole the ideawhom the ideals oa reality every day. for the men and women of the fbi i can say that jim appreciates the full worth of what you do. you can be sure that your director will steer a straight course. he will insist that investigations be thoroughly pursued to wherever they may go. as a former prosecutor in the front line against terrorism he will lead in that struggle. jim will be independent. in a town in which politics determine so much,
and discusses how it has shaped the copyright laws that we have today and this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you so much. as the dean indicated, most of us and a large number of legal scholars, you might be surprised to learn that an area that is not compelled by law, something that is informal but very organized, and it has grown up to fill the various needs and the various cracks in the wall of law and i am going to be talking about one of those major cracks in the law today and i will be focused on the 19th century in the united states and particularly on authors and publishers in america, really from the 1820s and 30s amah up to lease the end of the century where, as you will see, the world is really kind of turned upside down where publishing is concerned. lawful piracy is still regarded as piracy and yet it was lawful. and uncopyrighted works well protected by an informal system of rights that were recognized by publishers and how could this be and the answer lies in some of these mysteries of informal norms that exist alongside the law and sometimes even in place of the law.
law attorney seth. dr. scott, i start with you, this is an amazing story that president promises we can keep our health insurance coverage knowing that likelihood is 47% to 60% would close their coverage each year, millions of americans without coverage, he promised us the opposite. what do you make of this? >> this is an irs bulle but -- - >> bottom line is that i think they were anticipating the people would lose their coverage, and move into the exchanges. these are most lo lucrative, i suspect they would move on to plans they would like more, we're finding right now options are worse than they should in costs and benefit design. >> we've seen people say, they see increased costs but administration reporting that young people, individuals will see costs on their policies of just $50 a month, i have to tell you, i have not seen that in talking with anybody on our show. what do you think of the back and forth, a give and take between the white house and media on the topics? >> i think that it demonstrates that administration is not only not in control of what is going on, but they
testifying this afternoon. law makers want to know how long it is going on and who knew about it. the white house said president obama did not know that the nsa was monitoring the phone calls. >> lou dobbes makes a good point. you wonder how much of that sebelius will talk about tomorrow? >> you wonder if they know? >> or her answer every time they badger her with a question. >>> law makers looking to the answer to so many questions of what the government knew and web site. what do the web site delays mean for the implementation of the law. >>> one year ago today a monster storm settled over the northeast affecting millions of people and the recovery and progress made since super storm sandy. >>> and bringing terrorist to justice on benghazi. we'll talk on a law makers looking for that exact answer, next. >> every time i see this on tv, i see bloody finger prints crawling down the wall and i keep asking everybody. do they belong to my son? and no one has told me anything. [ indistinct conversations ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under atta
isn't just the website. it's the whole law. i have heard from hundreds of my constituents who are seeing their premiums rise. they are seeing their policies being cancelled. many again are lose can their plans. >> after their failed strategy to kill the law by shutting down the government, split the party in two. iranians are unified in sfaking problems on the website. >> i don't think anybody would deny this fact, these past 29 days have been nothing shorts of a disaster. >> when pressed, marilyn taffner refused to say how many people had actually been able to get insurance through the website. >> are you getting those numbers? >> am i getting those numbers? not yet. >> you have no numbers on who is enrolled? so you have no idea? >> well have those numbers available in november. >> if you don't have insurance by march 31st you face a fine. if the problems persist, more democrats are joining the republican call to delay that deadline. tavener vowed to fix what's wrong. ? >> i want to insure you that healthcare.gov can and will be fixed. we are working around the clock to deliv
. and then deval did the right thing by picking up the torch and working to make the law work even better. and it's because you guys had a proven model that we built the affordable care act on this template of proven bipartisan success. your law was the model for the nation's law. so let's look at what's happened. today the affordable care act requires insurance companies to abide by some of the strongest consumer protections this country has ever known. a true patients bill of rights. no more did he say crim naturing against kids with preexisting conditions.scriminating against kids with preexisting conditions. no more dropping your policy when you get sick and need it most. no more lifetime limits or restrictive annual limits. most plans now have to cover free preventive care, like mammograms and birth control. young people can stay on their parents' plans until they turn 26. all of this is in place right now. it is working right now. now, the last element of this began on october 1st. so when the affordable care act created a new marketplace for quality, private insurance plans for the 15% or
of the field of the national security law. my name is harvard for the standing committee on law and national security and i did that with jim mcpherson has the chair the committee. i want to get a few administrative issues out of the way. the first is for everyone in the room c-span is here so when you ask your questions we appreciate it if you would identify who you are and speak clearly in a short crisp question for the panel. i have a number of other administrative announcements. the first is cle for continuing legal education. we would like you to make sure you fill out the forms and give them to holly. you will also notice we have the scale of sheets that are on your table. they are reviews. we use them -- we review them very carefully afterwards. that is why we think our programs have improved over the years because we listen to what you have to say and try to give you the type of programs you really are interested in. we would also have another announcement. our committee will be having on friday november 15 an address addressed by ambassador marc grossman. he is the vice-chairman of
the massachusetts health care law. the same law that become the framework for the affordable care act. i don't remember conservatives complaining about the law then. back then everyone was all smiles, even this guy. a top official at the conservative think tank, the heritage foundation. look how happy he is. but now suddenly the heritage foundation is the group leading the charge against the president's health care law. it's even supported senator ted cruz's anti-obama care tour this summer. and today senator cruz continued that crusade at the headquarters for the heritage foundation. >> it is a particular privilege being here at heritage, heritage plays such an important role in helping articulate and defend conservative principles across this country. and in no fight has that been more apparent than in the fight over obama care. >> but republicans were on the other side of that fight just a few years ago. they've completely flip-flopped. now the whole right wing is against it. why? because president obama is for it. but he's come too far to back down now. >> and if if was hard doing it jus
republican complaints the new health care law is forcing the cancellation of many existing insurance plans. hundreds of thousands of people who have purchased their own insurance have reportedly begun receiving notices that their plans will be canceled or changed because they no longer meet the loss coverage requirements. 26 palestiniand prisoners as part of the agreement that reopened u.s.- backed peace talks earlier this year. it is the second wave of the releases that will ultimately free 104 of the thousands of palestinians in israeli prisons. as jubilant crowds greeted the freed prisoners in the west bank and gaza, israel announced today it plans to construct 1500 new homes in an east jerusalem settlement. the u.s. brokered israeli- palestinian negotiations are continuing behind closed doors. in a statement ahead of the prisoner's, the top palestinian negotiator yasser abed rabbo said israel's current stance in the talks is its most hardline in over 20 years. he said israel is seeking to hold onto major parts of the occupied west bank, "undermining the possibility of establishing ,"so
of progression of slowly dismantling the campaign-finance laws, the foundation of those laws we got in the 1970's. citizens united is by far the biggest there. upcoming case will be another one, the listing rules for aris. and potentially some court watchers believe, he could not down the benefits given to candidates and parties themselves. so, the citizens united is the most high-profile decision on this issue, but very much in a string of cases and we do not know how this is going to and yet either. marianne from tennessee on our line for independents. good morning. caller: good morning. i have a question about dark money. when the representatives who are supposed to be representing us shut down the government over obamacare, the stock market went down. resumed, iternment went up the same day. since these representatives get a heads up on the market movements, how many of them made money, who were they, and how much? host: andy kroll. guest: that is a good question. that gives back to what the previous color said about the stock act. there is absolutely the for them to act on information they h
of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country and there was a major ruling late today. >>> taking a hit. a stunner from consumer reports. some of the most popular cars on a the the road are no longer recommended. >>> and the babies born in the middle of a natural disaster now thriving as their first birthdays arrive. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. among industrialized nations, spying is considered something everybody does but nobody likes to talk about. the problem for the u.s. right now is everybody is talking about it and each day seems to bring a new allegation concerning the extent to which the u.s. has spied on other nations, especially our allies and friends. it's all coming from one man, edward snowden and the secrets he made off before he left as a u.s. intelligence analyst. now the white house is scrambling to soothe feelings while fielding questions about how much the president knew. we begin in washington tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the white house is under fire from its closest allies. for the firs
's . that started some conversations that initiate neighborhoods and law enforcement on the nightlife and entertainment. because of some of the work that you have done here, we have moved some conversations politically in which we have much more collaboration, much more cooperation and much more creativity when it comes to brainstorming. i want to thank your office to help us enforce the rules and i want to thank those in this room as well as those in c mac that gave my office ideas to make sure our party planning world would make sure it's successful that folks that operate parking lots are also responsible partners. all of these could not come from the work that all of you are doing with our entertainment commission staff to make sure that we are working together and moving in the right direction to ensure that we have the most successful and the best an most exciting nightlife in the country. i'm really excited about the fact that within a few short months we are going to be kicking off the america's cup in my district and hopefully we'll have the most amazing parties to entertain
. there has been many debates on how to implement lawyer's law which consist of outpatient treatment. it was named after laura wilcox, a mental health worker who had been shot to death by a man who refused treatment. the county r remains the only county to implement the law. there have been other counties in los angeles county and other counties who are considering it. >> why have they not adopted the law. what is it about forced treatment and the consequences for an allowing refusing treatment. we have a panel who have a knowledge of this subject in some cases because of their professional endeavors and in some cases because of personal experiences and in some cases, both. let me introduce them. karen chen is an attorney manager for the san francisco public defenders office, kathy, whose son battled mental illness, can is a subject treatment expert for the medical center. danny is the associate director for the serial neeb breet program for the city of san diego. and san francisco chief of police. gary is a psychiatrist and laura's law advocate and eduardo vega of the mental health
promise to getting the law passed if you like your doctor you can keep him, if you like your plan you can keep it. completely violated. completely untrue. in the wake of that, the democrats pull out a page from an old playbook which is, "it's not our fault." how does that play? >> i don't think it works. the president of the united states is on video dozens of times making the promise, repeating it, being emphatic about it. not that he said oegsally in passing if you like your plan you can keep it. he was saying this in response to republican claims that you would not be able to keep your plan even if you liked it. basically the defenders of the law have no arguments to make now. so they've got to choose two villains. one republicans in congress. the other, a valerie jarrett tweet, the president speaking in boston trying to villify insurance companies. you have now seen it in hearings the other day. >> they blame cancellations on the insurance companies who are obeying the laws they passed. >> right. >> the insurance companies are cancelling people because obama care requires them to. >>
, they are responsible for law enforcement and making sure that they are holding people accountable to obeying the law. they are going the extra mile with the outreach efforts. each and effort one of those officers is out and albert in particular, one of the things they add is do you want services. they offer that whether the hot team or any other entity is with them or not. i just want to make that point. they are there to enforce the law, but they have gone above and beyond and have been compassionate with the folks out there and of course doing what's in necessary when people are breaking the law. i do think the department of public health needs to do a lot more in its outreach effort. one of the things that you mentioned doctor roj that there was a time where you had on a daily basis outreach workers in the park area. you watched the numbers decline and now it's on an as needed basis. this is not a new problem. san francisco has a historical problem of homelessness of issues around mental health issues and the hate throughout the city and substance abuse issues. this is going to be something that
are equal in the eyes of the law. the passion and drive from so many cnbc and financial analysts goes solely in one direction and not in the direction you normally associate with journalism. here is maria reacting. >> i think any time you are looking at the greatest fine in wall street regulation it's worth asking should this guy stay in his job. >> the company continues to churn out tens of billions in earning and hundreds of billions in revenue, how do you criticize that? >> jon: because profit is the only way we judge things. only at cnbc is breaking bad the story how one man through hard work and bad business practices sloally insulates himself from criticism watch as they suggest there may be other ways of looking at morgan chase. >> a lot of earnings and \revenue/receive knew we've seen come from shady dealings. >> come on. >> it's a fact. it's in the news. >> what is the fact? >> they hired of children of prominent party officials and there's a spread sheet which connected the deals they were trying to do in china. >> i don't like hearing things that will not facts on this program. >>
into effect as the result of bigger waters flood insurance reform law. so i urge my colleagues in the senate to pass this bipartisan bill that was introduce by senator menendez and senator isakson that would delay the premium increases set to go into effect until after fema has done a study and provided congress with a plan to make the rates basically affordable. our families work so hard. they're trying to rebuild. and, frankly, they deserve nothing less. some homeowners, even as they do rebuild, have started seeing their rates increase. this would cause so many of our constituents to be forced out of their homes and communities that they love, that they lived in their whole lives. this is why the menendez-isakson bill is so critical and why i strongly urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support this commonsense legislation. now as we focus on providing communities with all of the resources they need to rebuild from sandy, the federal government is partnering with states and local governments, the private sector and academia to develop solutions that will protect us from the ne
at the same time, it must the united states department of justice and constrained by the rule of law balances ecks and built into our brilliant design by our nation's founders. a tension relate flekted in those two aspects of fidelity. two values that i see in that word. and that was detect in the ten-year term i've just begun. ten years to ensure independence and it's a fixed years to ensure the power is not concentrated in one person and unconstrained. the need for reflection and restraint of power is what led order all new agent classes visit the olocaust museum here in washington so they could see and way and hear in a palpable the consequences of abusive massive almost unimaginable scale. ob mueller continue that practice and i will again when we have agents graduating from quantico. the balance reflected in my term is also a product of lessons history ofd from the this great institution. our first half century or so is time of great progress and achievement in this country and bureau. but it saw abuse and overreach. most famously with respect to martin luther king and others. as i think
in this law. >> rolling disaster. >> i have a constituent. he received this cancellation letter. the president knew that these letters were coming. >> we are talking strictly about the 14 million people in the individual market. >> jay carney at the briefing effectively said -- >> there are going to be changes brought about by the affordable care act to create minimum standards. >> they can't be dropped for a richer package of benefits. >> maternity care, mental health services. >> this is government-run health care. >> i'll never stop fighting to help more hard-working americans know the economic security of health care. ♪ >> don't you worry. we will get to health care momentarily. but it is a very busy day in the capitol with a double dose of major congressional hearings, and challenges on twin fronts for the president. issue number one. oversight of the nsa. you are looking live right now at the house intelligence committee holding a hearing on that very issue. witnesses include the director of national intelligence, james clapper, who sounded a wri note on the outrage over
for the president of the united states. he's coming to friendly territory to try to sell a health care law that is sputtering and getting a lot of people protesting on the day his health and human services secretary was getting a real grilling. she took responsibility for that. the president will take responsibility for a law that he says is going to do a lot more good than bad in a place where a former governor by the name of mitt romney came up with health care for his constituents. the president is going to make a point of mentioning that, too, had a bumpy beginning. mitt romney by the way, has taken to facebook to say not at all the case. big apples, big oranges and this is a lemon, mr. president. now to the president selling what many people say is indeed a lemon, his law. >> it's good to be back in boston. it's good to be back in boston because one of america's best governors introduced me, deval patrick. give him a big round of applause. good to see congressman bill keating here. give bill a big round of applause. i want to praise somebody who was not here. i just left him. but he w
care law, but said ultimately, she is accountable. >> i am as frustrated and angry as anyone with the flawed launch of health care dot guv. so let me say directly to these americans, you deserve better. i apologize. >> chairman fred upton accused sebelius and others of false advertising prior to the healthcare.gov launch. >> over the months leading up to october 1 launch, the secretary and her colleagues at hhs repeatedly looked us in the eye and testified that everything was on track. >> after a lot of finger pointing in recent weeks, marsha blackburn from tennessee preced on who is to blame and asked if it was any of the top medicare officials. >> michelle snyder is the one responsible for this debacle? >> well -- excuse me, congresswoman. michelle snyder is not responsible for the debacle. hold me accountable for the debacle. i'm responsible. >> in four than four weeks after the launch, the website was taken off line again last night and remained out of commision all morning. >> the program has crashed and burned at least three times and the user is still having problems.
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